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Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2006  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 159-167
Attitude of Physicians towards the Follow-up of Renal Transplant Patients: A Questionnaire Survey in Saudi Arabia


Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Muhammad Ziad Souqiyyeh
The Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation, P.O. Box 27049, Riyadh, 11417
Saudi Arabia
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PMID: 16903621

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The goal of this study was to evaluate the attitude of the physicians towards the follow-up of the renal transplant patients in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). We sent a questionnaire to 168 physicians working in 148 active dialysis centers in the KSA. The study was conducted from June­October 2005. There were 140 physicians (83.3%) who answered the questionnaire; they represented 136 (91.9%) dialysis centers. There were 43 (31.2%) respondents who had a transplant clinic for follow­up of transplant recipients. Of the 96 (69.1%) who did not have a clinic, 29 (30.2%) claimed expertise for follow-up of transplant recipients, six (6.2%) had a laboratory set-up to monitor the immunosuppressive drug levels and 40 (44.4%) felt the need for one. There were 121 (89%) respondents who would consider the chronic renal failure (CRF) patients for transplantation because it is the best form of therapy. Seventy­seven respondents (55%) had a protocol for work-up of the CRF patients for transplantation, 31 (22.3%) had a coordinator for the work-up of the transplant candidates, 34 (24.5%) had regular meetings to decide on the waiting list for transplantation, and 51 (37.8%) had affiliation with, or worked at a transplant center. Nevertheless, 127 (90.7%) respondents believed that the results of renal transplantation were good enough to recommend the procedure to all patients as early as possible. There were 133 (97.1%) respondents who believed that organ shortage was the major factor for the low percentage of renal transplantation. Only 52 (37.1%) respondents knew about the recent regulations established by the World Health Organization (WHO) for organ donation. There were 63 (48.1%) respondents who believed that seeking commercial renal transplantation outside the KSA to be unacceptable because of the medical and ethical complications involved. Many respondents (71.4%) from non-MOH hospitals, and those who had transplant clinics believed that the tacrolimus + mycophenolate combination was the most popular immunosuppressive regimen for renal transplant patients. Our survey suggests that the current practices concerning the work­up and follow-up of transplant patients in the dialysis centers in the KSA require refinement in terms of the need to enforce the use of a protocol to guide evaluation and therapy in each dialysis unit.


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