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Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2009  |  Volume : 20  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 370-374
Acute rejection episodes after kidney transplantation


1 Department of Nephrology, Charles Nicolle Hospital, Tunis, Tunisia
2 Laboratory of Immunology: LITRI LR 03SP01, Tunisia
3 Laboratory of Renal Pathology: LR 00SP01, Tunisia

Correspondence Address:
Fethi Ben Hamida
Department of Nephrology, Charles Nicolle Hospital, Tunis
Tunisia
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PMID: 19414936

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Acute rejection episodes (AREs) are a major determinant of renal allograft survival. The incorporation of new immunosuppressive agents explains, at least partially, the improvement seen in the results of transplantation in recent years. The objectives of this study are to analyze the incidence and severity of AREs, their risk factors and their influence on graft and patient survival. We retrospectively studied 280 kidney transplants performed in adults at the Charles Nicolle Hospital, Tunis, between 1986 and 2004. The diagnosis of ARE was based on clinical data and response to treatment. Allograft biopsies were performed in ten cases. The treatment of AREs consisted of pulse methylprednisolone and anti­thymocyte globulin. There were 186 males (66.4%) and 94 females (33.6%), and their mean age was 31 ± 8.9 years. Overall, the 280 study patients experienced a total of 113 AREs. Of them, 85 had only one ARE, 28 had two to three and none had more than three AREs. A total of 68 AREs were completely re­versible, 42 were partially reversible while three could not be reversed with treatment. The mean inci­dence of AREs was 40.4%. The incidence was > 45% between 1986 and 1997, decreased to 20.5% between 1998 and 2000 and to 9% between 2001 and 2004. Graft survival rates in patients with and without AREs were respectively 91% and 93% at three years, 82% and 90% at five years and 73% and 83% at 10 years. We found a decrease in the incidence of AREs in recent years in our study patients, and this was related to the introduction of sensitized cross-match and the newer immunosuppressive agents, particularly MMF. Additionally, AREs had a deleterious impact on late graft survival in our study population.


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