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Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
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Year : 2010  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 81-86
Patterns of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney diseases in black Africans


Nephrology and Dialysis Department, Teaching Hospital Aristide, Le Dantec-Dakar BP,Dakar, Senegal

Correspondence Address:
Sidy Mohamed Seck
Nephrology and Dialysis Department, Teaching Hospital Aristide, Le Dantec-Dakar BP, Dakar
Senegal
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PMID: 20061698

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Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is not well described in black Africans while some data suggesting the disease is exceptional in this race. A retrospective study of patients with ADPKD followed in nephrology department of a teaching hospital in Dakar (January 1, 1995 to December 31, 2005) was therefore undertaken. Prevalence of ADPKD was one in 250. Mean age was 47 ± 5 years with a predominance of male (57%). High blood pressure (HBP) was present in 68% of patients. Other renal manifestations were flank pain, hematuria and proteinuria. Majority of patients had impaired renal function at time of diagnosis. Extra-renal cysts were essentially found in liver (45.5%), pancreas and seminal vesicles. Main complications: ESRD (51%) occurred within a 6 year mean period, urinary tract infection (13%) and cerebral haemorrhage (2%). HBP control, in general needed 2 or more antihypertensive drugs. Fourteen patients died, ten patients had been on haemodialysis and four others died from uremic compli­cations. In conclusion, ADPKD in black African adults is not rare and probably underdiagnosed. Early HBP and ESRD are likely more frequent than in other races. Earlier ultrasound detection and strategies to preserve renal function should be offered to at-risk individuals to improve outcomes.


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