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Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2010  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 678-685
Meeting the American diabetic association standards of diabetic care


1 Department of Medicine, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University of Health Sciences, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Pharmacy, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University of Health Sciences, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University of Health Sciences, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Mubashar Kharal
Assistant Professor of Medicine, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University of Health Sciences; Consultant, Division of Internal Medicine, Department of Medicine, King Abdulaziz Medical City P.O. Box 22490, Riyadh 11426
Saudi Arabia
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PMID: 20587872

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Although there are numerous studies on diabetes mellitus in Saudi Arabia, data on the extent to which American Diabetic Association (ADA) standards of diabetic care are met, is scarce. We studied the computerized records of adult diabetic patients followed-up in outpatient internal medicine clinics at our tertiary care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia to find out how many of them met the ADA standards of diabetic care regarding fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, LDL-C, hypertension, proteinuria screening and use of anti-platelet, lipid lowering or recommended anti­hypertensive medications. Out of 1,188 type-2 diabetic patients studied, blood pressure readings were available in 1180 (99%) while results of fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, LDL-C and albumi­nuria screening were available for 1123 (95%), 968 (81%), 1037 (87%) and 307 patients, (26%) respectively. Patients achieving the ADA targets for overall, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, LDL-C and albuminuria screening were 39.0%, 40.6%, 74.6%, 25.0%, 21.8%, 55.5% and 34.9%, respectively. For prevention of cardiovascular events, 61.0%, were using angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin-2 receptor blockers (ARBs) or both, while 71.5% and 72.3% of our patients were on anti-platelet and statin medica­tions, respectively. In conclusion, as reported in most other studies, we also found that ADA stan­dards of diabetic care are not met in most of our diabetic patients, indicating that these standards are easy to preach than to practice. There is need for further research to investigate the reasons for this failure and to adopt better multi-disciplinary approach and realistic targets in the future.


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