Home About us Current issue Back issues Submission Instructions Advertise Contact Login   

Search Article 
  
Advanced search 
 
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
Users online: 806 Home Bookmark this page Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font size Increase font size 


 
REVIEW ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2011  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 637-650
Renal transplantation in developing countries


South West Transplant Centre, Plymouth Hospitals NHS Trust, Derriford Hospital, Plymouth, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Jacob A Akoh
Consultant General & Transplant Surgeon, Level 04, Derriford Hospital Plymouth PL6 8DH
United Kingdom
Login to access the Email id


PMID: 21743206

Rights and Permissions

Patients with established renal failure, living in developing countries, face many obstacles including lack of access to transplantation centers, quality and safety issues, and exploittation associated with transplant tourism. This review aims to determine the state and outcome of renal transplantation performed in developing countries and to recommend some solutions. The lack of suitable legislation and infrastructure has prevented growth of deceased donor programs; so, living donors have continued to be the major source of transplantable kidneys. Transplant tourism and commercial kidney transplants are associated with a high incidence of surgical complications, acute rejection and invasive infection, which cause major morbidity and mortality. Developing transplant services worldwide has many benefits - improving the results of transplantation as they would be performed legally, increasing the donor pool, making transplant tourism unnecessary and granting various governments the moral courage to fight unacceptable practices. A private-public partnership underpinned by transparency, public audit and accountability is a prerequisite for effective transplant services in the developing world. Finally, lack of dialysis facilities coupled with better outcomes in patients spending <6 months on dialysis prior to transplantation favor pre-emptive transplantation in developing countries.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article  Email this article
    

  Similar in PUBMED
    Search Pubmed for
    Search in Google Scholar for
   Citation Manager
  Access Statistics
   Reader Comments
   Email Alert *
   Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed7490    
    Printed241    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded1391    
    Comments [Add]    
    Cited by others 2    

Recommend this journal