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Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 24  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 247-253
The new technique of using the epigastric arteries in renal transplantation with multiple renal arteries


1 Department of Urology, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran
2 Department of Nephrology, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran
3 Department of Gynecology, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran
4 Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Mohammad Ali Amirzargar
Department of Urology, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan
Iran
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DOI: 10.4103/1319-2442.109565

PMID: 23538346

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The most common anatomic variant seen in the donor kidneys for renal transplantation is multiple renal arteries (MRA), which can cause an increased risk of complications. We describe the long-term outcomes of 16 years of experience in 76 kidney transplantations with MRAs. In a new reconstruction technique, we remove arterial clamps after anastomosing the donor to the recipient's main renal vessels, which cause backflow from accessory arteries to prevent thrombosis. By this technique, we reduce the ischemic times as well as the operating times. Both in live or cadaver donor kidneys, lower polar arteries were anastomosed to the inferior epigastric artery and upper polar arteries were anastomosed to the superior epigastric arteries. Injection of Papaverine and ablation of sympathic nerves of these arteries dilate and prevent them from post-operative spasm. Follow-up DTPA renal scan in all patients showed good perfusion and function of the transplanted kidney, except two cases of polar arterial thrombosis. Mean creatinine levels during at least two years of follow-up remained acceptable. Patient and graft survival were excellent. No cases of ATN, hypertension, rejection and urologic complications were found. In conclusion, this technique can be safely and successfully utilized for renal transplantation with kidneys having MRAs, and may be associated with a lower complication rate and better graft function compared with the existing techniques.


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