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Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 27  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 67-72
The predictive factors for relapses in children with steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome


1 Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Al-Nahrain University, Baghdad, Iraq
2 Al-Kadhymia Teaching Hospital, Baghdad, Iraq

Correspondence Address:
Shatha Hussain Ali
Department of Pediatrics, College of Medicine, Al - Nahrain University, P. O. Box 70074, Baghdad
Iraq
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DOI: 10.4103/1319-2442.174075

PMID: 26787569

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Most patients with steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) have frequent relapses (FR); this is considered one of the main problems because of its association with a high incidence of complications. The aim of our study was to evaluate the different factors that might be associated with the occurrence of relapse in SSNS. This is a retrospective study of 80 patients with SSNS conducted at the Pediatric Nephrology Clinic in the Al-Kadhymia Teaching Hospital between January 2011 and November 2011. The study patients were divided into two groups: FR and infrequent relapses (IFR). The age of the study patients was between one and 14 years; 45 patients had FR (56.3%) and 35 patients had IFR (43.7%). Males constituted 55 patients (68.7%) and 25 patients were female (31.3%). The incidence of FR was high in all age-groups, except in the 1-5 years age-group, and was higher in children living in urban areas. There was no significant difference between the two groups in age, gender, place of residence and renal functions. However, there was a significant difference in the presence of hematuria, time taken to respond to therapy and duration of steroid therapy required; all were higher in the FR group. Our results will help clinicians in identifying possible FR such that they may be monitored closely.


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