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Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
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Table of Contents   
LETTER TO THE EDITOR  
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 27  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1274-1275
Remarks about the study on the effect of phototherapy on urinary calcium excretion in term neonates


Department of Pediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, Baghdad University, Baghdad, Iraq

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Date of Web Publication28-Nov-2016
 

How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Remarks about the study on the effect of phototherapy on urinary calcium excretion in term neonates. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2016;27:1274-5

How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Remarks about the study on the effect of phototherapy on urinary calcium excretion in term neonates. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl [serial online] 2016 [cited 2020 Jan 19];27:1274-5. Available from: http://www.sjkdt.org/text.asp?2016/27/6/1274/194687
To the Editor,

I read with interest the study by Asl et al on the effect of phototherapy on urinary calcium excretion in term neonates. [1] The authors mentioned that they did not find any significant difference between urinary calcium levels (P = 0.0001), urinary creatinine levels (P = 0.954), or the calcium/creatinine ratio (P = 0.086), before and after phototherapy. Based on these findings, the authors concluded that phototherapy might increase urinary calcium excretion although it does not cause hypocalcemia. [1] I presume that there is an important limitation that might make the aforementioned conclusion questionable. It is obvious that Vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy is a worldwide problem. Adequate calcium and Vitamin D supplementation during pregnancy is fundamental for calcium homeostasis, bone mineralization, and fetal growth. Recently, published data pointed out that more than half of the Iranian mothers and their neonates had some degrees of Vitamin D deficiency. [2] To be more specific, the degree of Vitamin D insufficiency (20-30 ng/mL) and deficiency (<20 ng/mL) in mothers and neonates was found to be 60.2%, 48.9% and 1.1%, 2.5%, respectively. Calcium deficiency (<8.5 mg/dL) was present in 33.5% of the mothers and 25% of the neonates. [2] A suggestion has been made to administer Vitamin D3 at a dose >50,000 IU/ month during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy for Vitamin D-deficient Iranian pregnant women in order for their neonates to achieve serum 25(OH)D levels >20 ng/mL. [3] It was not obvious in the study methodology whether the authors have considered the Vitamin D status in the mothers of the studied neonates during their pregnancies. It was also not obvious whether those who were Vitamin D-deficient had received Vitamin D supplementation during their antenatal care visits. This ultimately might cast some suspicions on the accuracy of the study results.

Conflict of interest: None declared.


Author's reply

Dr. Afshin Safaei Asl,

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Nephrology, Guilan University of Medical Sciences, Rasht, Iran.

To the Editor,

This reply is in response to questions raised about our published article entitled, "The effect of phototherapy on urinary calcium excretion in term neonates," which was published in the May 2016 issue of the Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation.

In this study, the methodology was designed according to the effect of phototherapy on urinary calcium excretion in term neonates and we did not consider the Vitamin D status in the mothers of the studied neonates during their pregnancies. The levels of Vitamin D during pregnancy were not measured. The design was based on the aim of the study that was the effect of phototherapy on urinary calcium excretion in term neonates.

 
   References Top

1.
Asl AS, Zarkeshl M, Heidarzadeh A, Maleknejad S, Hagikhani K. The effect of phototherapy on urinary calcium excretion in term neonates. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2016;27:486-92.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  Medknow Journal  
2.
Abbasian M, Chaman R, Amiri M, et al. Vitamin D deficiency in pregnant women and their neonates. Glob J Health Sci 2016;8: 54008.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Shakiba M, Iranmanesh MR. Vitamin D requirement in pregnancy to prevent deficiency in neonates: A randomised trial. Singapore Med J 2013;54:285-8.  Back to cited text no. 3
    

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Correspondence Address:
Mahmood Dhahir Al-Mendalawi
Department of Pediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, Baghdad University, Baghdad
Iraq
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DOI: 10.4103/1319-2442.194687

PMID: 27900980

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