Home About us Current issue Back issues Submission Instructions Advertise Contact Login   

Search Article 
  
Advanced search 
 
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
Users online: 6545 Home Bookmark this page Print this page Email this page Small font sizeDefault font size Increase font size 
 


 
Table of Contents   
LETTER TO THE EDITOR  
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 558-559
Serosurveillance and prompt treatment of toxoplasmosis among renal recipients is needed: A path probability analysis


1 Sanitation 1 Medical Academic Center, Bangkok, Thailand
2 Dr. D. Y. Patil University, Pune, Maharashtra, India

Click here for correspondence address and email

Date of Submission18-Aug-2018
Date of Acceptance20-Aug-2018
Date of Web Publication23-Apr-2019
 

How to cite this article:
Joob B, Wiwanitkit V. Serosurveillance and prompt treatment of toxoplasmosis among renal recipients is needed: A path probability analysis. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2019;30:558-9

How to cite this URL:
Joob B, Wiwanitkit V. Serosurveillance and prompt treatment of toxoplasmosis among renal recipients is needed: A path probability analysis. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl [serial online] 2019 [cited 2019 May 20];30:558-9. Available from: http://www.sjkdt.org/text.asp?2019/30/2/558/256871


To the Editor,

Toxoplasmosis is an important tropical infection caused by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. The infection becomes an important disease among immunocompromised people. Renal transplant recipients (RTR) are also considered a risk group for getting toxoplasmosis. In tropical countries, such as Thailand, the recommendation for having donor serological screening for toxoplasmosis is raised.[1] In this article, the authors discuss the situation based on Thailand, a tropical country in Indochina. According to a previous study, the seroprevalence of toxoplasmosis among RTR is about 11%.[1] Sukthana et al noted that “Potential donors with positive toxoplasma antibody should be rejected, but if that is unavoidable, 6-week prophylactic treatment of primary infection in kidney recipients should be administered.”[1] Here, the authors performed a path probability analysis of the occurrence of toxoplasmosis among RTR based on Thai situation.

Basically, the seroprevalence rate for toxoplasmosis among healthy Thai people, the blood donors, is about 3.1%.[2] Based on this information, the expected rate of seropositivity for the kidney donor should also be 3.1% and the same rate for the background seropositivity for RTR prior to transplantation should be 3.1%. If the transplantation is done regardless of the serological status of toxoplasmosis, the expected most possible transmission rate of toxoplasmosis to the RTR should be 3.1%. The finalized expected seropositive rate of RTR should be equal to 6.2%, which is the summation of the background seropositive rate and the expected most possible transmission rate. Nevertheless, a previous report shows that the seroprevalence among renal recipients is 11%. The additional acquired risk of toxoplasmosis in RTR is probably related to might be the new infection that acquired post transplantation.

Therefore, simple prophylactic treatment of primary infection might not be enough. There must be additional regular serosurveillance for toxoplasmosis for renal recipients, and prompt management is needed for any positive case.

Conflict of interest: None declared.



 
   References Top

1.
Sukthana Y, Chintana T, Damrongkitchaiporn S, Lekkla A. Serological study of Toxoplasma gondii in kidney recipients. J Med Assoc Thai 2001;84:1137-41.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Maruyama S, Boonmar S, Morita Y, et al. Seroprevalence of Bartonella henselae and Toxoplasma gondii among healthy individuals in Thailand. J Vet Med Sci 2000;62:635-7.  Back to cited text no. 2
    

Top
Correspondence Address:
Beuy Joob
Sanitation 1 Medical Academic Center, Bangkok
Thailand
Login to access the Email id


DOI: 10.4103/1319-2442.256871

PMID: 31031400

Rights and Permissions




 

Top
   
 
 
    Similar in PUBMED
    Search Pubmed for
    Search in Google Scholar for
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  
 


 
    References
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed56    
    Printed0    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded14    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal