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Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2019  |  Volume : 30  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 581-586
Using single-item survey to study the prevalence of burnout among medical residents-influence of gender and seniority


General Surgery Department, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Greenwich and Lewisham NHS Trust, Greenwich, London, UK

Correspondence Address:
Rehab A AlSayari
Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Greenwich and Lewisham NHS Trust, Greenwich, London, SE18 6AJ
UK
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DOI: 10.4103/1319-2442.261330

PMID: 31249221

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The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of burnout among medical residents in and assess the influence of certain demographic factors. The residents were asked to classify their level of burnout (according to one out of five levels of burnout) using their own definition of burnout. This survey was undertaken away from any examination time and confidentially ascertained. The frequency of burnout and itself level were calculated and compared between genders and year of training using the Chi-square. Eighty-two residents responded to the survey (100% of attendees and 91.1% of all residents in the department); 74.2% were male and 25.8% of female, 38.7% were in their 1st year of training, 24.2% in their 2nd year, 29.0% in their 3rd year, and 8.1% in their 4th year. The overall burnout frequency was 41.9% (29% with moderate burnout, and 12.9% with severe burnout). Overall twice as many female residents had burnout than males (P = 0.017). The prevalence of “moderate burnout” among males and females was 19.8% and 56.3%, respectively. However, no difference between males and females was seen in the “severe burnout” category (13% and 12.5%, respectively). The overall burnout rate was the lowest in the 1st year of training (33.3%) and the highest in the last (60%) but with no statistical significance (P = 0.4). Whereas 2/3rd of the male residents had no burnout, only 1/3rd one their female counterparts had no burnout (P = 0.017). Conversely, the prevalence of “moderate burnout” among males and females was 19.8% and 56.3%, respectively (P = 0.002). However, no difference between males and females was seen in the “severe burnout” category (13% and 12.5%, respectively. In conclusion, 50% of the residents had burnout which was significantly more prevalent in females. The rate of burnout is the highest in the last year of training and the lowest in the 1st year


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