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Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
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RENAL DATA FROM ASIA–AFRICA Table of Contents   
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 245-253
Deceased donor organ transplantation potential: A peep into an untapped gold mine


1 Department of Surgery, University of Ilorin, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria
2 Department of Anesthesia, University of Ilorin, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria
3 Department of Medicine, University of Ilorin, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria
4 Department of Accident and Emergency, University of Ilorin, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Ademola Alabi Popoola
Department of Surgery, University of Ilorin, University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Ilorin
Nigeria
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DOI: 10.4103/1319-2442.279947

PMID: 32129219

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Organ transplantation is the gold standard for treating end-stage organ diseases, many of whom are on waiting lists. The reasons for this include the nonavailability of suitable organs to be transplanted. In many nations, most of these challenges have been surmounted by the adoption of deceased donor program, which is not so in sub-Saharan countries such as Nigeria. This study is to audit the potentially transplantable organs available from potential deceased donors from a Nigerian tertiary hospital. This is a study of deaths in the intensive care unit (ICU) and the accident and emergency units of the University of Ilorin Teaching Hospital, Nigeria. Data included the biodata, social history, diagnosis or indications for admission, time of arrival and death, causes of death, associated comorbidities, potential organs available, social history, and availability of relations at the time of death. There were 104 deaths in the ICU and 10 patients in the accident and emergency unit. There were 66 males (57.9%) and 48 females (42.1%). Eighty patients were Muslims (70.2%) and 34 were Christians (19.8%). A total of 33 participants were unmarried (28.9%),whereas 81 (71.1%) were married. The tribes of the patients were Yoruba (105, 92.1%), Igbo (7, 6.1%), Hausa (1, 0.9%), and Nupe (1, 0.9%). The age range was 0.08-85 years. Twenty-two (19.3%) had primary and the remaining had at least secondary education. The causes of death were myriad, and there were relatives available at the times of all deaths. The Maastricht classification of the deaths were Class I - 1 (0.9%), Class II - 37 (32.2%), Class III - 9 (7.8%), Class IV - 20 (17.4%), and Class V - 47(40.9%). There were no transplantable organs in 42 (36.5%), one organ in eight (7%), two organs in two (7%), three organs in one (0.9%), four organs in 13 (11.3%), five organs in six (5.2%), six organs in 11 (9.6%), seven organs in 11 (9.6%), eight organs in five (13%), and nine organs in five (4.3%). Deceased donor sources of organs are worthy of being exploited to improve organ transplantation in Nigeria.


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