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Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
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BRIEF COMMUNICATION Table of Contents   
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 448-453
Changes in body mass index after pediatric renal transplantation


1 Department of Internal Medicine, Chronic Renal Failure Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
2 Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Chronic Renal Failure Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
3 Division of Pediatric Endocrinology and Metabolism, Hyperlipidemia Research Center, School of Medicine, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran
4 Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Ali Asghar Children's Hospital, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
5 Department of Epidemiology, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Ehsan Valavi
Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Chronic Renal Failure Research Center, Ahvaz Jundishapur University of Medical Sciences, Ahvaz
Iran
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DOI: 10.4103/1319-2442.284020

PMID: 32394918

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Significant weight gain following renal transplantation is common in adult and pediatric recipients and mostly depends on receiving higher doses of steroids, changes in mood and feelings, as well as their level of physical activities. This study was performed to evaluate body weight and body mass index (BMI) before and after kidney transplantation in children and adolescents. In this cross-sectional study, 71 pediatric renal transplant recipients (42 boys and 29 girls) were included. World Health Organization criteria were used for comparing Z-score BMI for age in our cases. Overweight was defined as Z-score BMI >+1 SD (standard deviation) and obesity as >+2 SD. At the time of transplantation, the mean age was 10.8 ± 3 years (5-16 years) and based on BMIZ-score, the patients were found to be thin (BMIZs <-2 SD) in 16.9%, normal (BMIZs = -2 to +1 SD) in 67.6%, overweight (>+1 SD to +2 SD) in 9.9%, and obese (BMIZs >+2 SD) in 5.6%.The mean follow-up duration after transplantation was 3.57 ± 1.68 years (1-7 years) and at the time of reevaluation after transplant, their mean age was 14.4 years (6-18 years). The mean BMI was 22 ± 5.3 kg/m2, and for BMI grouping, the patients were thin in 7%, normal in 54.9%, overweight in 21.1%, and obese in 17%. Pretransplant thinness (BMIZs <-2 SD) was found in 12 patients (16.9%), equally in boys and girls, and in most of them (83.3%), BMIZs changed to normal or even >+1 SD after transplant. Chronic continuous decrease of glomerular filtration rate (CCD/GFR) was found in 27 cases (38%); 74.1% were male (P = 0.045), hypertriglyceridemia was found in 74.1% (P = 0.023%), hypercholesterolemia in 63% (P = 0.032),and obesity in 18.5% (p = 0.5). The incidence of obesity has tripled after kidney transplantation. It was not a risk factor for graft or patient survival in our experience, whereas pretransplant obesity had some effects on long-term graft outcome.


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