Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation

SPECIAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2003  |  Volume : 14  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 197--201

A Database for the Management of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics Results of Renal Transplantation Patients


Ali Hajeer1, Samir Issa2, Hana Fakhoury3, Samir Huraib4, Ghormallah Al Ghamdi4, Ahamad Flaiw4, Abdulmajeed Alabdulkareem2,  
1 Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard, Riyadh King Fahad National Guard Hospital, P. O. Box 22490, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Hepatobiliary Sciences and Liver Transplantation, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard, Riyadh King Fahad National Guard Hospital, P. O. Box 22490, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia
3 School of Nursing, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard, Riyadh King Fahad National Guard Hospital, P. O. Box 22490, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia
4 Dept of Nephrology, King Abdulaziz Medical City, National Guard, Riyadh King Fahad National Guard Hospital, P. O. Box 22490, Riyadh 11426, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Ali Hajeer
Department of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine-1122, King Fahad National Guard Hospital, P.O. Box 22490, Riyadh 11426
Saudi Arabia

Abstract

To establish a multi-relational database to include data on renal transplantation patients«SQ» HLA results, panel reactive antibodies (PRA), antibody crossmatching, blood transfusions and cytokine gene polymorphisms, we designed a database using a Microsoft office application, Access®. Accordingly, any combination of the results«SQ» tables can be obtained in one single table. We believe that Access® is a good tool to organize the collected data on renal transplant patients and may serve to obtain fast reports on patients and enhance research.



How to cite this article:
Hajeer A, Issa S, Fakhoury H, Huraib S, Al Ghamdi G, Flaiw A, Alabdulkareem A. A Database for the Management of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics Results of Renal Transplantation Patients.Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2003;14:197-201


How to cite this URL:
Hajeer A, Issa S, Fakhoury H, Huraib S, Al Ghamdi G, Flaiw A, Alabdulkareem A. A Database for the Management of Histocompatibility and Immunogenetics Results of Renal Transplantation Patients. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl [serial online] 2003 [cited 2019 Dec 10 ];14:197-201
Available from: http://www.sjkdt.org/text.asp?2003/14/2/197/33030


Full Text

 Introduction



Matching for HLA in renal transplantation plays a major role in the long-term graft survival. [1],[2] The level of the panel reactive antibodies (PRA) can also influence the graft survival. [3],[4] Identifying the antigen specificity of PRA as well as the husband's antigens in multi-parous women and mismatched HLA antigens in previously rejected kidney(s) can help in selecting future donors. [5] Those antigens are called unacceptable antigens. Several labo­ ratories produce a list of those antigens and use them to select future potential donors especially for highly sensitized individuals. Furthermore, recent genetic association studies identified poly­morphisms in cytokine/receptor genes in the donor that appear to influence graft survival. [6],[7],[8]

In this study, we have designed a comprehen­sive database on renal transplantation patients' HLA results, PRA, antibody crossmatching, blood transfusions and cytokine gene polymor­phisms that is characterized by easy data entry and retrieval.

 Methods



A relational database was established using Microsoft Access® software (an application in the Microsoft office), [Figure 1]. Several tables were designed and were connected by the patient hospital number. The main table conta­ined clinical data of the patient. The other tables contained the different laboratory results. One table contained fields for the HLA typing results, and another table contained results of PRA and its specificity. There were other tables on cross matching results, cytokine gene poly­morphisms transfusion and unacceptable antigens.

Data entry was designed in a form containing all the above tables. The main table, patient information, had all the other tables embedded into it, [Figure 2],[Figure 3].

Once the medical record number (MRN) was entered, it would be copied automatically to all the other tables. Navigation between tables was made easy; each of the tables heading appeared in the main table and with a click of an icon one could move from one table to another, [Figure 3]. Once data were entered, an icon to save data and start a new blank entry was provided. The donor's HLA results were entered through another menu. This table was connected with that for the cross matching.

 Results



The results of patients' HLA and other entries could be viewed using the report facility in Access®. All tables could be searched for and results presented in report forms. The patient's MRN was used as the key for the query.

The main switchboard, [Figure 1], contained icons to view the patients HLA results, [Figure 4], cross matching, [Figure 5], PRA, and cytokine gene polymorphisms and unacceptable antigen list, [Figure 6].

The results of the PRA and cross matching were designed in a table format, so when more than one result is available, a list sorted by date of test appears automatically allowing the review of as many PRA results and specifi­cities as possible. When one or more potential donors are available, the donor's result can be selected by entering the donor's hospital number and only that result is presented to view or print. All results reports combine the data from patient's data in the relevant table.

The HLA results, unacceptable antigen list and cytokine gene polymorphisms can be viewed and printed in a similar fashion, whenever the patient hospital number is entered.

 Discussion



We have designed a relational database that incorporates data from kidney transplant donors and recipients, allowing for easy data entry and retrieval. Cross matching reports on different recipients versus one cadaver donor can be searched for by logging in recipient's and donor's hospital numbers.

The database allows for simple data entry using user-friendly forms. The database was designed to allow easy management of kidney donor and recipient data.

In addition, research programs can be designed to analyze the data on all patient groups. The results of the cytokine gene polymorphisms, for example, can be attached with the clinical data and the concept of evidence-based medicine can be utilized to analyze and compare data results among different transplant centers.

Furthermore, since the highly sensitized patients can be a problem when it comes to re­transplants, [9] using this designed data base can easily follow such patients over time.

In conclusion, we believe that the designed database, which combines the histocompa­tibility and immunogenetics results on renal transplant patients, can be useful for clinical practice and research.

References

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