Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation

RENAL DATA FROM THE ASIA - AFRICA
Year
: 2011  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 594--596

Mortality rate of patients with end stage renal disease on regular hemodialysis: A single center study


Mohamed Elhafiz Elsharif 
 Department of Nephrology, Gazira Hospital for Renal Diseases, Khartoum, North Sudan

Correspondence Address:
Mohamed Elhafiz Elsharif
Department of Nephrology, Gazira Hospital for Renal Diseases, P.O. Box 335, Khartoum, North Sudan

Abstract

End stage renal disease (ESRD) is a devastating medical, social and economic problem in any community and needs dedicated supervision and health care. It is fatal unless treated properly. Despite the improvements in dialysis care, the mortality of patients with ESRD remains high. We retrospectively studied 242 patients with ESRD on regular hemodialysis (HD) at Gezira Hospital for Renal Diseases and Surgery, Sudan, from 1 January to 31 December 2008, to determine the mortality rate and causes of mortality. We found that the mortality rate was 7.44% per year and the leading cause of death was infections (45%) and cardiovascular (22%) diseases.



How to cite this article:
Elsharif ME. Mortality rate of patients with end stage renal disease on regular hemodialysis: A single center study.Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2011;22:594-596


How to cite this URL:
Elsharif ME. Mortality rate of patients with end stage renal disease on regular hemodialysis: A single center study. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl [serial online] 2011 [cited 2019 Dec 8 ];22:594-596
Available from: http://www.sjkdt.org/text.asp?2011/22/3/594/80510


Full Text

 Introduction



End-stage renal disease (ESRD) is a devastating medical, social and economic problem in any community and needs dedicated supervision and health care. It is fatal unless treated properly. [1] ESRD is associated with an overall 1-year mortality of 23.5% in the US, of which cardiac causes constitute 50% of all deaths. [2] Although maintenance dialysis prevents death from uremia, patient survival remains an important issue. Once renal replacement therapy is initiated, the range of the expected remaining lifespan according to the United States Renal Data System report is 7-11 years (varies with race) for dialysis patients aged 40-44 years and 4-6 years for those aged 60-64 years. [3]

 Subjects and Methods



This retrospective study included a total of 242 patients with ESRD on regular hemodialysis (HD) at Gezira Hospital for Renal Diseases and Surgery, Sudan, and was done in the period from 1 January to 31 December 2008. Medical records of all patients were studied. All our patients received two sessions of HD per week, and each session was for 4 hours. SPSS was used to analyze the results.

 Results



Two hundred forty-two patients were included in this study. The whole study group results revealed that 66.52% (161) were males and 33.47% (81) were females. The mean age was 44.08 (SD 16.36) years and the mean HD duration was 30.29 (SD 25.56) months. Mortality rate per 1-year was found to be 7.44% (18). The mean age for the mortality group and the survival group was found to be 50.44 (SD 14.17) and 43.95 (SD 16.36) years, respectively, and the mean duration of HD for the mortality group and the survival group was found to be 21.94 (SD 18.26) and 30.30 (SD 25.65) months, respectively. In the mortality group, 50% (9) were males and 50% (9) were fe-males, while in the survival group, 67.85% (152) were males and 32.14% (72) were females. [Figure 1] shows the causes of death.{Figure 1}

 Discussion



Although all our patients were receiving only two sessions of HD per week (8 hours per week), our study reveals a mortality rate of 7.44% per year, while the mortality rate was reported to be 6.6% in Japan, 15.6% in Europe, and 21.7% in the US. [4] The mean age of 50.44 years in our group is less than the mean age reported in the HD patients from the US, Europe and Japan where it is 60.5, 60.2 and 58.6 years, respectively, [3] but more than the mean age group reported from Libya and Saudi Arabia. [5],[6] Bloembergen et al reported that males had a 22% higher risk of death than females, [7] but we found no difference between male and female mortality and cardiovascular disease accounts for approximately 50% of deaths. While a decline in cardiovascular deaths has occurred in the general population, a similar trend has not been observed in dialysis patients. [1] In our study, deaths due to acute myocardial infarction and cerebral vascular accident represent 5% and 17%, respectively. The leading cause of death in our study is infection (45%), while other centers reported it to be second cause of death.

References

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2Wallen, MD, Radhakrishnan, J, Appel, G, et al. An analysis of cardiac mortality in patients with new-onset end-stage renal disease in New York State. Clin Nephrol 2001;55:101.
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