Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation

RENAL DATA FROM THE ARAB WORLD
Year
: 2011  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 818--824

Why does kidney allograft fail? A long-term single-center experience


Sameer Alarrayed, Amgad El-Agroudy, Ahmed Al-Arrayed, Sumaya Ghareeb, Eman Farid, Taysir Garadah, Sadiq Abdulla 
 Nephrology and Kidney Transplantation Department, Salmaniya Medical Complex, MOH, College of Medicine, Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Kingdom of Bahrain

Correspondence Address:
Sameer Alarrayed
Consultant, Head of Nephrology and Kidney Transplantation Department, Salmaniya Medical Complex, Ministry of Health, Manama
Kingdom of Bahrain

We studied the characteristics and the predictors of survival in Bahraini renal transplant recipients with an allograft that functioned for more than 10 years. Seventy-eight patients underwent renal transplantation between 1982 and 1999. Among them, 56 patients maintained functioning allografts for more than 10 years (range 10-30 years). Characteristics of the surviving patients, data on graft survival, and determinants of outcome were obtained by reviewing all medical records. The mean age at time of renal transplantation was 33.6 ± 15.3 years. The source of the graft in 42 (75%) recipients was from living related donors with a mean age of 31.4 ± 7.7 years, and it was the first graft in 48 recipients. The primary immunosuppression regimen consisted of cyclosporine (CsA) and prednisolone. Azathioprine (AZA) was given to 52 (92.9%) recipients, while four patients received steroids and AZA only. Induction therapy was administered to 30 patients in the CsA group. Acute rejection episodes occurred in eight (14.3%) patients, of whom two experienced two episodes. During the last follow-up in January 2010, the mean serum creatinine was 118.3 ± 46.5 μmol/L. A history of cancer was noted in one patient, whereas hypertension was encountered in 54% and diabetes mellitus in 20.5%. We compared the graft functioning group with the graft failure group and found that the independent determinants of long-term graft survival included time of late acute rejection episodes and histopathologic findings of chronic allograft damage, post-transplant hypertension and serum creatinine at one year. We conclude that renal transplantation even in its earliest years and despite the associated numerous complications has provided a ten-year or more of near-normal life to patients with end-stage renal disease.


How to cite this article:
Alarrayed S, El-Agroudy A, Al-Arrayed A, Ghareeb S, Farid E, Garadah T, Abdulla S. Why does kidney allograft fail? A long-term single-center experience.Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2011;22:818-824


How to cite this URL:
Alarrayed S, El-Agroudy A, Al-Arrayed A, Ghareeb S, Farid E, Garadah T, Abdulla S. Why does kidney allograft fail? A long-term single-center experience. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl [serial online] 2011 [cited 2019 Aug 18 ];22:818-824
Available from: http://www.sjkdt.org/article.asp?issn=1319-2442;year=2011;volume=22;issue=4;spage=818;epage=824;aulast=Alarrayed;type=0