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Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
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Table of Contents   
LETTER TO THE EDITOR  
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 1150-1151
Be Aware! COVID-19 Can Remain Active on Environmental Surfaces in Hemodialysis Settings and Endanger the Patients' Life


Patient Safety Research Center, Clinical Research Institute, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia, Iran

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Date of Web Publication21-Nov-2020
 

How to cite this article:
Aghakhani N, Rahbar N. Be Aware! COVID-19 Can Remain Active on Environmental Surfaces in Hemodialysis Settings and Endanger the Patients' Life. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2020;31:1150-1

How to cite this URL:
Aghakhani N, Rahbar N. Be Aware! COVID-19 Can Remain Active on Environmental Surfaces in Hemodialysis Settings and Endanger the Patients' Life. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Dec 2];31:1150-1. Available from: https://www.sjkdt.org/text.asp?2020/31/5/1150/301187


To the Editor,

A serious pandemic outbreak of COVID-19 has been spread very rapidly to all over the world. Epidemiological studies show that COVID-19 patients with chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, or the elderly, newborns, and pregnant women are at higher risk of hospitalization in intensive care units or death. In addition, the impact of COVID-19 on uremic patients should not be ignored because of their low immune function.[1]

Hemodialysis (HD) as a treatment method to prepare a good quality of life for the patients ameliorates clinical manifestations and reduces the probability of imminent death. Health-care providers are responsible to offer the best possible care for their patients based on medical ethics if they are affected by a suppressed immunity, multiple blood transfusions, prolonged vascular exposure, contaminated devices, attending personnel, and environmental surfaces.[2],[3]

Infections have become the second-most common cause of morbidity in HD patients. The frequency of death among them is several times higher than the normal population. These risk factors increase mortality in use of a central venous catheter, proximity to other patients, having hypoalbuminemia, diabetes mellitus, and anemia.[4]

For preventing of mortality and morbidity resulted from viral infections, the World Health Organization recommends to decrease the viral load on environmental surfaces by frequently touched surfaces, correct and consistent disinfection by cleaning commonly used hospital disinfectants. Installing hand wash facilities as an appropriate protective measure can be significantly associated with health-care staff and patients protection from acquiring viral diseases.[5]

Thus, we believe that human coronaviruses can remain active on environmental surfaces of HD settings for some days, and surface disinfection reduces their infectivity. Evidencebased international guidelines, based mostly on expert opinions supported by well-established studies are necessary and have top priority in every decision that may be made in reducing viral infections. Being aware of the latest guidelines and serious in implementing them consistently and quality improvement plans are important in each HD unit at different places, according to prevalence and incidence of any infection.

Conflict of interest: None declared.



 
   References Top

1.
Schaier M, Leick A, Uhlmann L, et al. End-stage renal disease, dialysis, kidney transplantation and their impact on CD4+ T-cell differentiation. Immunology 2018;155:211-24.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Bernieh B. Viral hepatitis in hemodialysis: An update. J Transl Int Med 2015; 3:93-105.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Aghakhani N, Baghaei R. Reducing suicidal ideation in hemodialysis patients treated in Urmia, Iran. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2020; 31:296-7.  Back to cited text no. 3
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
4.
Abou Dagher G, Harmouche E, Jabbour E, Bachir R, Zebian D, Bou Chebl R. Sepsis in hemodialysis patients. BMC Emerg Med 2015; 15:30.  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
WHO. Infection Prevention and Control during Health Care When Novel Coronavirus (nCoV) Infection Is Suspected (Interim Guidance, 25 January 2020). WHO; 2020.  Back to cited text no. 5
    

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Correspondence Address:
Nader Aghakhani
Patient Safety Research Center, Clinical Research Institute, Urmia University of Medical Sciences, Urmia
Iran
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DOI: 10.4103/1319-2442.301187

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