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Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation
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ORIGINAL ARTICLE Table of Contents   
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 31  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1225-1233
A study of quality of life among hemodialysis patients and its associated factors using kidney disease quality of life instrument-SF36 in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia


1 College of Medicine, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
2 Department of Medical Education, College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
3 Department of Medical Education, College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences; Department of Medicine, Division of Nephrology, King Abdulaziz Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Abdulaziz Ajeebi
College of Medicine, King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh
Saudi Arabia
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DOI: 10.4103/1319-2442.308331

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We aimed in this study to assess the quality of life for kidney-ill patients using Kidney Disease Quality of Life Instrument-SF36 (KDQOL-SF36) and the impact of other demographic, clinical, and social factors on patients’ QOL. The quality of life was assessed using an Arabic version of KDQOL-36. The KDQOL-36 subscales Physical Component Summary (PCS), Mental Component Summary (MCS), Burden of Kidney Disease, and Effects of Kidney Disease were calculated. The effect of sex, diabetic status, diabetes mellitus, marital and status employment status, etc. on these subscales was evaluated. Reliability was determined by calculating Cronbach’s alpha. A total of 254 patients were enrolled. The mean age was 58.2 (standard deviation 18.2) years; 61% were male, 56.7% diabetic and 20.1% were employed. The mean domain scores on the PCS, MCS, burden of kidney disease, and effects of kidney disease subscales were 49.4, 38.7, 52.6, and 37.2, respectively. Afternoon shift patients score highest among all shifts in MCS and PCS (P = 0.0001). The MCS score (38.7 ± 28.7) was significantly lower than PCS (49.4 ± 16.5) (P = 0.0001). The “effect of kidney disease” subscale was higher in males (P = 0.02), employed patients (P = 0.02), in the afternoon dialysis shift (0.0001). For PCS higher scores were seen in males (P = 0.0001), in non-diabetics (compared to diabetics) (P = 0,006), in the employed patients (P = 0.02). The highest score was seen in the “burden of kidney disease” subscale and the lowest in the “effects of kidney disease” subscale. Higher scores were seen in males, in nondiabetics, in the employed patients.


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