Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year
: 2010  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 5  |  Page : 964--966

Associations of various histological morphologies of renal involvement in hepatitis B infection: Analysis of 118 subjects


Hossein Khedmat1, Saeed Taheri2,  
1 Baqiyatallah Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
2 Baqiyatallah Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran; Dr. Taheri Medical Research Group, Tehran, P.O. Box 14155-6437, 1435915371, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Hossein Khedmat
Baqiyatallah Research Center for Gastroenterology and Liver Diseases, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran
Iran




How to cite this article:
Khedmat H, Taheri S. Associations of various histological morphologies of renal involvement in hepatitis B infection: Analysis of 118 subjects.Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2010;21:964-966


How to cite this URL:
Khedmat H, Taheri S. Associations of various histological morphologies of renal involvement in hepatitis B infection: Analysis of 118 subjects. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl [serial online] 2010 [cited 2022 Jan 28 ];21:964-966
Available from: https://www.sjkdt.org/text.asp?2010/21/5/964/68907


Full Text

To the Editor,

HBV-related nephropathy is one of the HBV infection extra-hepatic manifestations. The asso­ciation between chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and glomerular diseases was first des­cribed by Combes et al in 1971, [1] and since then several morphological patterns for glomerular lesions have been described including mem­branous nephropathy, membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis, mesangial proliferative glo­merulonephritis, minimal change disease, IgA nephropathy, and focal segmental glomerulo­sclerosis. [2],[3] However, because of the rarity of the condition, almost all data existing on this issue in the literature has limited patient po­pulations making it difficult to analyze various associations of morphological patterns of HBV related nephropathies. In two previous studies, we reviewed nephropathies associated with the HBV infection and efficacy of current treat­ment strategies. [4],[5] In this study, however, we conducted a literature review to collect data from different studies to be able to make ana­lyses for any associations of histological le­sions of HBV related nephropathy.

Overall 118 subjects from ten studies [6],[7],[8],[9],[10],[11],[12],[13],[14],[15] were included into analysis. All HBs Ag negative patients had IgA nephropathy while only 43% of HBs Ag positive patients had IgA nephro­pathy (P< 0.001). Development of IgA neph­ropathy in HBV infected patients was signi­ficantly associated with a negative result for HBe Ag (9% vs. 77%, P< 00.001) while mem­branous nephropathy was significantly repre­sented with HBe Ag positivity (70% vs. 20, P< 0.001). IgA nephropathy was more frequently seen among adult patients (67% vs. 22%, P= 0.013); but in children, membranous nephro­pathy was more likely to occur (56% vs. 16%, P= 0.014), and; membranous nephropathy was in general significantly associated with renal failure (P= 0.021).

[Table 1] summarizes associations of different types of renal lesions with all other variables. Patients with IgA nephropathy had signifi­cantly lower AST (26.7 ± 5.8 vs. 58.6 ± 32.5 IU/L P= 0.001) and ALT (25.2 ± 8.0 vs. 85.1 ± 94.7 IU/l, P= 0.019) levels compared to other histological features.

We conclude that viral antigen type contri­butes to the disparities between various mor­phological renal lesions in HBV related neph­ropathies. Membranous nephropathy represen­ted the highest renal failure rate; and needs more intensive management strategies.{Table 1}

References

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15URL< http://bhj.org/journal/2001_4301_jan/none original_128. htm> ACCESSED May 6, 2009.