Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year
: 2010  |  Volume : 21  |  Issue : 6  |  Page : 1135--1136

A comparison between urinary bladder temperature and rectal, axillary and oral temperatures following kidney transplantation


Hassan Ahmadnia, Mohammad J Mojahedi, Mohammad Khaje Dalooee, Saeed R Ghanbarizadeh 
 Department of Urology and Nephrology, Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Science, Mashhad, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Hassan Ahmadnia
Department of Urology and Nephrology, Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Science, Mashhad
Iran




How to cite this article:
Ahmadnia H, Mojahedi MJ, Dalooee MK, Ghanbarizadeh SR. A comparison between urinary bladder temperature and rectal, axillary and oral temperatures following kidney transplantation.Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2010;21:1135-1136


How to cite this URL:
Ahmadnia H, Mojahedi MJ, Dalooee MK, Ghanbarizadeh SR. A comparison between urinary bladder temperature and rectal, axillary and oral temperatures following kidney transplantation. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl [serial online] 2010 [cited 2021 Oct 23 ];21:1135-1136
Available from: https://www.sjkdt.org/text.asp?2010/21/6/1135/72307


Full Text

To the Editor,

Measurement of temperature or core tempe­rature as a part of vital signs is particularly important in the critical care patient. Frequent changes in temperature have led to the use of rectal probes for continuous monitoring of hypo­thermic or hyperthermic patients. [1]

Patients with indwelling Foley catheter with a specialized thermo probe can have continuous monitoring of body temperature. [2]

In this study, we compared the temperatures of urinary bladder, rectum, axilla and mouth in patients who underwent kidney transplantation.

Twenty patients (14 males and mean age 34 years) admitted for kidney transplantation sur­gery were evaluated. The patients who were catheterized with Foley urinary catheter with thermistor probe (Sensor 2 way silicone catheter, Rusch, Germany) during and after surgical procedure had their intra-vesical temperatures re­corded.

Oral, axillary and intra-vesical temperatures were recorded at two hours interval and rectal temperature was recorded every 12 hours, for four days postoperatively.

Oral, axillary and rectal temperatures were measured using conventional thermometer.

Then, the recorded data were analyzed using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) computer package. In this study, the tempera­ture measurement by intravesical thermo probe was no better than rectal, oral or axillary tem­peratures.

The mean temperatures recorded from mouth, axilla, rectum and bladder over a period of 4 days were 36.91 ± 0.3ºC, 36.6 ± 0.32ºC, 37.25 ± 0.35ºC, 37.8 ± 0.3ºC, respectively.

The repeated measurement test showed sig­nificant differences between mean temperature in four methods (χ2 = 24.58, P < 0.001).

The correlation between oral and intravesical temperature (r = 0.914, P < 0.001), axillary and intravesical temperature (r = 0.936, P < 0.001), rectal and intravesical temperature (r = 0.927, P < 0.001) was linear and direct.

Body temperature being an important part of monitoring of critically ill patients has been studied by several authors. Fulbrook suggested that axillary temperature compared favorably with pulmonary artery (PA) temperature and is the site of choice in the absence of invasive catheters. [3] The rectal site is widely assumed most closely to reflect core temperature. Inac­curate measurement, however, may result due to the rectal wall insulation, especially during rapid re-warming of hypothermic patients and in patients with constipation. [4],[5]

Bladder temperature measured using thermis­tor or thermocouple within an indwelling ca­theter was found to be more accurate than or at least similar to rectal temperature. [6],[7] We did not find bladder temperature to be significantly better than that found by other methods. In pa­tients where continuous temperature monito­ring is needed, in the absence of pulmonary artery catheters, bladder temperature monito­ring could provide a continuous display of core temperature.[8]

Although bladder temperature is not consi­dered as a true measure of core temperature, it is detected later than the changes in esophageal and nasopharyngeal temperatures (closer to core temperature) but earlier than rectal and skin temperature respond. [9]

In conclusion, due to its ease, catheterization of bladder with a temperature monitoring probe in critically ill patients requiring continuous dis­play of core temperature provides an alterna­tive method. It, however, seems to be of simi­lar efficacy to axillary and rectal temperature monitoring.

 Acknowledgment



Special thanks to Vice President of research in MUMS for the great support.

References

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