Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation

LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 28  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 188--189

Cultural and religious issues in organ transplantation: Crucial role in multiethnic countries


Mostafa Mostafazadeh-Bora1, Amin Zarghami2,  
1 Department of Nursing, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Chancellor for Health, Iranshahr University of Medical Sciences, Iranshahr, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Amin Zarghami
Chancellor for Health, Iranshahr University of Medical Sciences, Iranshahr
Iran




How to cite this article:
Mostafazadeh-Bora M, Zarghami A. Cultural and religious issues in organ transplantation: Crucial role in multiethnic countries.Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2017;28:188-189


How to cite this URL:
Mostafazadeh-Bora M, Zarghami A. Cultural and religious issues in organ transplantation: Crucial role in multiethnic countries. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 Oct 20 ];28:188-189
Available from: https://www.sjkdt.org/text.asp?2017/28/1/188/198275


Full Text

To the Editor,

In the July 2016 issue of the Saudi Journal Kidney Diseases and Transplantation, there were two interesting studies regarding organ donation. First, in a prospective study by Flayou et al in which the attitude of the medical staff toward organ donation was evaluated.[1] In another study conducted with the aim to determine the knowledge, awareness, and acceptability of renal transplantation among patients with end-stage renal disease in Ibadan, Nigeria.[2] In both studies, religious and culture have vital influencing factors in organ donation.

One of the challenges between medical team about organ transplantation is religious and cultural differences. Various factors influence organ donation such as, this being a humanitarian act, perceived quality of care, family experience, lack of knowledge, fear of donation, and religious view.[3] Beliefs in religious countries play a vital role in tissue and organ transplantation.[4] However, the little attention has been given about religious and cultural issues in different ethnicities, particularly in Iran.

Religious beliefs have a positive attitude about tissue and organ transplantation. Despite positive attitude different religious, organ donation rate remains low. Maybe, this problem is due to insufficient awareness of people about religious leaders' views on this issue.[5] For example, view of Christianity about organ transplant is positive and support any act of altruism. The Qur'an accepts removal organs only as a way of treating the ailment; the success of the transplantation must be highly probable; the donor or the family must have consented to it; and if possible transplantation must be between Muslims only.[6]

Cultural view about transplantation is varied. Some cultures give great importance to ancestral traditions and beliefs. They believe there is a transfer of the spirit from the donor to receipt and do special rituals for this process.[7] Asian people have a relatively higher negative attitude about organ donation than other US residents. For example, Caucasian Americans are more willing compared with Asian Americans for organ donation as a social responsibility.[8] Cultural and religious variations are playing an important role in the formation of beliefs about organ donation. Understanding and knowledge about transplantation require teamwork. In addition, providing an opportunity for consultation with a religious leader about organ donation and establishing an educational reform system can improve the current low rates of organ transplantation.

Conflict of interest. None declared.

References

1Flayou K, Kouam N, Miara H, et al. Attitudes toward organ donation among personnel from the University Hospital of Rabat. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2016;27:758-61.
2Takure AO, Jinadu YO, Adebayo SA, Shittu OB, Salako BL, Kadiri S. The knowledge, awareness, and acceptability of renal transplantation among patients with end-stage renal disease in Ibadan, Nigeria. Saudi J Kidney Dis Transpl 2016;27:769-73.
3Beigzadeh A, Bahmanbijari B, Salajegheh M, Haghdoost AA, Rezaei H. Factors influencing decisions on organ donation in brain death patients. J Emerg Pract Trauma 2015;1:60-6.
4Goodarzi P, Aghayan HR, Larijani B, et al. Tissue and organ donation and transplantation in Iran. Cell Tissue Bank 2015;16:295-301.
5Afzal Aghaee M, Dehghani M, Sadeghi M, Khaleghi E. Awareness of religious leaders' fatwa and willingness to donate organ. Int J Organ Transplant Med 2015;6:158-64.
6Slabbert M, Mnyongani F, Goolam N. Law religion and organ transplants. Koers 2011;76: 261-82.
7Molzahn AE, Starzomski R, McDonald M, O'Loughlin C. Aboriginal beliefs about organ donation: some Coast Salish viewpoints. Can J Nurs Res 2004;36:110-28.
8Park HS, Shin YS, Yun D. Differences between white Americans and Asian Americans for social responsibility, individual right and intentions regarding organ donation. J Health Psychol 2009;14:707-12.